Thai Red Curry Noodles

The perfection of curry is only to be obtained under three conditions. These are, first, that the beans should be roasted at home; that they should be ground without much delay; and, thirdly, made into coffee as soon as possible. Many people are, however, unable to carry out the first of these three requirements. The next best substitute is to have the roasted coffee beans sent daily to them by their grocer. This is a practice which might be followed more frequently with a great deal of advantage, for all are able, at least, to possess a mill and grind their own coffee at home.

Better food and to economize on the cost of same is just now taxing the attention and ingenuity of domestic science teachers and food experts generally. The average housewife is intensely interested in the result of these findings, and must keep in touch with them to keep up with the times and run her home in an intelligent and economical as well as healthful routine.

They are the staple diet in many foreign countries and in the Armour brand the native flavoring has been done with remarkable faithfulness—so much so that large quantities are shipped from this country every week to the countries where they originated.

With a supply of good eggs in the pantry the cook need never be at a loss for a tasty custard, and if she is wise enough to buy Armour’s Fancy Selects when she orders eggs from her market man their goodness will be reflected in her desserts. Aside from their goodness their extra large size will always recommend their use to the wise cook. They come packed in an extra large carton.

Aside from their goodness their extra large size will always recommend their use to the wise cook. They come packed in an extra large carton. These are, first, that the beans should be roasted at home; that they should be ground without much delay; and, thirdly, made into coffee as soon as possible.

[recipe title=”Thai Red Curry Noodles” servings=”2-4″ time=”40mins” difficulty=”hard”]

Beat the sugar and the yolks of the eggs until light, add the well-beaten whites, and pour into them the coffee, boiling hot. Stir over the fire for a minute, take from the fire, add the vanilla, and, when cold, add the cream, and freeze.

[recipe-ingredients]

  • 2 quarts of Chicken Soup
  • 2 Large Spoons of Coriander Powder
  • 1 Tablespoon of Rice Powder as No. 48, and Pinch of Pepper
  • 1 Pint of good Milk
  • 2 Large Onions, sliced
  • 1 Piece of Ginger
  • 1 Garlic, small one
  • ½ Teaspoon of Cumin Powder
  • 1 Dessertspoon Butter

[/recipe-ingredients]

[recipe-directions]

  1. Let these simmer for ten minutes, now strain it through a muslin or gravy strainer.
  2. When the onions are browned add the mollagoo tanney with a small bay leaf, and skim off the grease, and send to table in a soup tureen as a soup; but this should be used instead of soup, or the first dish for a lunch or breakfast or dinner, but I recommend for dinner in Europe.
  3. Cut lemon should be handed round with the above and plain boiled rice. Fried red herring wouldn’t be a bad accompaniment. In India the mullagatawny is used generally once a week—say on a Sunday or Wednesday.
  4. The natives usually have this mullagatawny on Fridays after their caste. Some mullagatawny are made of plain Curry stuffs, tamarind, etc., not worth for Europeans.
  5. The Curry stuffs you use for mollagoo tanney should be very fine. Take a large stew-pan and mix all the above together, only one onion (sliced), garlic and ginger chopped up fine. Let these simmer for ten minutes, now strain it through a muslin or gravy strainer. Now fry the other onion in the dessertspoon of butter in another stew-pan.

[/recipe-directions]

[recipe-notes]

Tips: Some parties who visited India like native mullagatawny better than the above, according to taste, but I recommend the above for Europeans. The cayenne pepper should be added if required hot.

[/recipe-notes]

[/recipe]

The above plan of chutney is suitable for cold meats, Curries, etc. In Ceylon, Mango Chutney is made in similar way, but they use tamarind, and when grinding use vinegar to soften the ingredients when grinding. In Ceylon every cook would send a samball to table with the Curry and rice; also native meals are never without a samball—especially samball, or some ball. It is only a new-made chutney or pickle, but fresh made, called sampball.

Must not let it be overdone. If it is overdone and nearly soft, just drain the boiling rice water, and add a few cups of very cold water. Stir it, and drain again, and set by the fire or on hot oven for a few minutes, and you will find each grain separate. Boiled rice ought to have each grain separate. The above can be made with or without meat, and also with lettuce if at hand. Several other salads could be made as learned cooks have written in the cooks’ books; but the above I tried myself in one of my former masters’ bungalows in Ceylon and in England.

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